Andrew Frederick   Jessen

Andrew Frederick Jessen[1, 2]

Male 1900 - 1964  (63 years)

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  • Name Andrew Frederick Jessen 
    • Andrew Frederick became a missionary.
    Born 28 Oct 1900  Queensland, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Birth Registration
      JESSEN, Andrew Frederick: Birth: 28.10.1900: Father: Andrew Frederick: Mother: Matilda Christina BUNDESEN Reg No 1900/C8384 [Queensland Birth Register]



    Gender Male 
    Arrival in Aust 10 Feb 1931  From Columbo to Brisbane and Worroolin, Queensland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Arrivals
    Passenger
    JESSEN, Andrew Frederick, Mr
    Ship /Aircraft Name: NARKUNDA
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Brisbane
    Date of arrival: 10 Feb 1931

    Arrivals
    Passenger
    JESSEN, Juanita, Mrs.
    Ship /Aircraft Name: NARKUNDA
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Brisbane
    Date of arrival: 10 Feb 1931
    (National Archives of Australia)

    S.S. NARKUNDA, from London, arriving at Freemantle, 10 Feb 1931
    Commonwealth of Australia
    Quarantine Service
    JESSEN, Mr Andrew Frederick, second class, from Columbo to Brisbane, destination, Wooroolin, Kingaroy Line, Queensland
    JESSEN, Mrs Juanita, second class, rom Columbo to Brisbane, destination, Wooroolin, Kingaroy Line, Queensland
    Commonwealth of Australia, Quarantine Service)
     
    Arrival in Aust 19 Apr 1938  From Colombo, Ceylon to Brisbane, Queensland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Passenger
    JESSEN, Andrew, MR.
    Ship/Aircraft Name: Strathallan
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Brisbane
    Date of arrival: 19 Apr 1938

    Passenger
    JESSEN, Juanita, MRS.
    Ship/Aircraft Name: Strathallan
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Brisbane
    Date of arrival: 19 Apr 1938

    Passenger
    JESSEN, Ronald, Master
    Ship/Aircraft Name: Strathallan
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Brisbane
    Date of arrival: 19 Apr 1938
    (National Archives of Australia)

    S.S. Strathallan, 19 Apr 1938 at Freemantle from London
    Commonwealth of Australia
    Quarantine Service

    Jessen, Mr Andrew, tourist, from Columbo to Brisbane, destination, Wooroolin, Kingaroy Line, Queensland

    Jessen, Mrs Juanita, tourist, from Columbo to Brisbane, destination, Wooroolin, Kingaroy Line, Queensland

    Jessen, Master Ronald, tourist, from Columbo to Brisbane, destination, Wooroolin, Kingaroy Line, Queensland

    (Commonwealth of Australia, Quarantine Service)

    Name: Master Ronald Jessen
    Departure Place: London, United Kingdom
    Arrival Date: 19 Apr 1938
    Arrival Place: Fremantle, Western
    Australia
    Vessel: Strathallan
    (Fremantle, Western Australia, Passenger Lists, 1897-1963 Australia) 
    Personal 22 Jun 1938  Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser, Queensland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    NETHERBY
    NETHERBY, June 17.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Jessen junior, and son from Ceylon, and Mrs. Shannon, Roma, were recent visitors to their aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. S. Jessen. "Riverview."
    Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser, Queensland, Wednesday, 22 June 1938 
    Arrival in Aust 8 Jun 1948  From Columbo to Sydney, New South Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Passenger
    JESSEN, Andrew Frederick, Mr
    Ship/Aircraft Name: STRATHAIRD
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Sydney
    Date of arrival: 08 Jun 1948

    Arrivals
    Passenger
    JESSEN, Juanita, Mrs.
    Ship /Aircraft Name: STRATHAIRD
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Sydney
    Date of arrival: 08 Jun 1948

    Passenger
    JESSEN, Ronald Frederick, Master
    Ship/Aircraft Name: STRATHAIRD
    Port of embarkation: Colombo
    Port of disembarkation: Sydney
    Date of arrival: 08 Jun 1948

    S.S. STRATHAIRD arrival Freemantle on 8 Jun 1948 from London
    Commonwealth of Australia
    Quarantine Service
    Jessen, Pastor Andrew Frederick, Columbo to Sydney, address at destination in Australia, C/o Mrs. A.F. Jessen, Wooroolin, Queensland
    Jessen, Mrs Juanita, Columbo to Sydney, address at destination in Australia, C/o Mrs. A.F. Jessen, Wooroolin, Queensland
    Jessen, Master Ronald Frederick, Columbo to Sydney, address at destination in Australia, C/o Mrs. A.F. Jessen, Wooroolin, Queensland
    (Fremantle, Western Australia, Passenger Lists, 1897-1963, National Archives of Australia)  
    Departure 19 Aug 1948  Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Andrew Frederick Jessen, aged 47, travelled on the Ship R.M.M.S. Aorangi with his wife Juanita and his son Ronald Frederick.
    The Ship Aorangi departed from Sydney, Australia on the 19 Aug 1948 and arrived in Vancouver/Victoria, British Columbia, Canada on 10 Sep 1918. The family travelled third class.
    The ship called in to Hawaii on 4 Sep 1948 and the Jessen family were granted shore leave.
    Andrew Frederick Jessen was going to the General Conference of Seventh Day Adventists at Tacoma Park, Washington, where the family planned to stay for 6 months. Andrew paid the tax for the boarder crossing from Canada for himself and Juanita. Ronald was exempt.

    Border Crossings from Canada to U.S. 1895 -1956
    Name: Andrew Frederick Jessen Arrival Date: 10 Sep 1948 Age: 47 Birth Date: abt 1901 Gender: Male Ship Name: Aorangi Port of Arrival: Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Port of Departure: Sydney, Australia

    Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger Lists, 1900 -1953
    Name: Andrew Federick Jessen Age: 47 Gender: Male Birth Year: abt 1901 Port of Departure: Sydney, Australia Departure Date: 19 Aug 1948 Ship: Aorangi Port of Arrival: Honolulu, Hawaii Arrival Date: 4 Sep 1948 Ethnicity/Race/Nationality: British (English)

    Canadian Australian Line
    Sailings August 1948-December 1949 (issued June 4, 1948) for:
    Aorangi
    Ports of call:
    Vancouver, Victoria, Honolulu, Suva, Auckland, Sydney

    The Aorangi (17,491 grt, 600 ft. long) was delivered in 1924 to the Union Line of New Zealand.
    She was transferred in 1931 to the Canadian Australasian Line, a company formed jointly
    by the Union Line and Canadian Pacific to operate the transpacific service between Australia/New Zealand and Canada.
    She was sold for scrap in 1953.

    The ship was named after Mount Aorangi, a mountain on New Zealand's South Island. Aorangi is from the Maori language 'cloud in the sky'

    During the World War Two the Aorangi was used to transport New Zealand and Australian Troops and for many other purposes by the British Ministry of War Transport.

    After being returned to her owners in May 1946, she was reconditioned at Sydney and resumed service in August 1948 with accommodation for 212-1st, 170-cabin and 104-3rd class passengers for the Vancouver - Australia service. The service was plagued by union problems among the stewards and seamen. Because of demands for higher wages, the liner operated at a loss, but aided by subsidies from the Australian, New Zealand and Canadian governments the ship remained in service until June, 1953. The Aorangi's last voyage from Vancouver for Australia commenced on 14th May 1953.
    The liner was retired that summer and arrived in Dalmuir, Scotland late in July 1953 for scrapping.
     
    Arrival 15 Mar 1949  Southampton, England, from New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Ship, H.M.S. Queen Elizabeth
    Port of Arrival: Southampton, 15 Mar 1949, from New York
    Jessen, F.J., transit to India, Missionary, India
    Jessen, Junita, transit to India, Missionary, India
    Jessen Ronald F., transit to India, Student, India
    (Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960) 
    Personal 15 Aug 1951  Eastern Tidings, POONA, INDIA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    MEET OUR WORKERS!
    Pastor A. F. Jessen, one of Australia's sons, came to Ceylon as a
    colporteur in 1923 and placed hundreds of the book "Daniel and the Revelation" in Ceylon homes.
    During his many years of service
    in the Southern Asia Division, Pastor Jessen has served as principal of
    two of our schools-Kottawa High
    School, Ceylon, and Kottarakara
    High School, Travancore. He has also
    been superintendent of the Ceylon
    Union Mission from 1941-1945; the
    North Malayalam Mission from 1946-
    1949; and from 1949 to the present
    he has been president of the South
    Kerala Mission and principal of the
    Kottarakara. High School.
    Pastor Jessen says their aim is to
    double the membership of the mission as soon as possible.
    (Eastern Tidings, POONA, INDIA, AUGUST 15, 1951)  
    Personal 4 May 1954  The Youth Instructor/ The Times of India. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    PRIEST REPORTED
    DEAD IS ALIVE
    Pak Rail Crash
    By A Staff Reporter
    A Minister of the Seventh Day
    Adventist Church in India, who
    was reported to have been killed
    in the Jhimpur rail crash, 75
    miles from Karachi, has actually
    escaped from a flaming compartment and reached Bombay by air.

    He is Pastor A. F. Jessen,
    President of the North-Western
    India Union Mission, who was
    referred to in a news agency
    message from Karachi as a
    "European priest", who refused
    to to leave his compartment stating: "I am safe. I shall come with my companions who are in trouble."

    Pastor Jessen stated in Bombay on Saturday, just before leaving for Poona: "I was able to save the man (an electrical engineer in the Pakistan Air Force)
    I was trying to extricate. I es-
    caped by the Providence of God
    without a scratch or a bruise."

    The pastor stated that he found
    the electrical engineer, his companion in a second-class compartment, crushed under a seat a few moments after the crash had occurred. He tried to extricate the engineer, but found it
    "impossible" to remove the heavy
    weight of "debris" which had fallen on him.
    Pastor Jessen said he then offered a prayer and made another attempt to extricate him and succeeded in doing so. By that time flames were all around them, but they managed to climb out
    of the burning compartment.
    (The Youth Instructor, May 4, 1954)

    The newspaper clipping is from
    the Times of India.  
    Accident 4 May 1954  The Youth Instructor, Seventh Day Adventist Journal Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Without a Scratch
    By A. F. JESSEN
    MY FIRST visit to Pakistan was four days than one person has brief. But I lived more in those a right to expect in a lifetime. The express I had boarded at Multan, more than five hundred miles up the Indus River, was speeding through the night toward Karachi, at the river's mouth. There were two railway tracks. On one was our train, having eleven cars pulled by a large Diesel engine. On the other was an oil freight, with from fifteen to twenty loaded tank cars coming north from Karachi. At a curve on the line the freight had been derailed, and one tanker had evidently come across our track or close to it. Our engineer could not see the danger in time. That is how I came to be in the news.

    God had been preparing me for this experience at the pleasant constituency meeting held at our Roorkee Secondary Boarding School. For six enjoyable days some one hundred of us had met together in this beautiful spot, from which we had a glorious view of the majestic snow-clad ranges of the Himalayas.

    Meanwhile, a need arose over in Pakistan calling for one of the division
    officials to make a visit, but because none of them could complete their passport requirements in time, I was sent across the border to bring back a report.

    Crossing over from Amritsar, I arrived
    at our Pakistan headquarters in Lahore on the afternoon of January 18. It was a cold, wintry day, and the rain was falling steadily. That evening Pastor Alexander drove me out thirty-five miles to his school at Chuharkana, where his acres of wheat were giving promise of a good harvest.

    Up early the following morning, we
    reached Lahore in time to meet our appointment with a bishop whose hospital
    and church at Multan, I was to inspect
    with a view to purchasing. Then 240
    miles by bus brought me to the large city of Multan late at night. Next morning, the twentieth, I was shown the hospital and cathedral, and had made copious notes concerning them.

    That afternoon I boarded the express
    passenger train for Karachi. In my
    second-class compartment were five very
    congenial Pakistani fellow passengers.
    The afternoon passed very pleasantly, and at 10 P.M., after an enjoyable game with the lively six-year-old daughter of the chief veterinary surgeon of Pakistan, we said our good nights and retired to our berths for sleep; mine happened to be an upper berth.

    About five-thirty in the morning I was
    awakened by a jolt, and the carriage had
    a crazy motion. There were smashing
    sounds outside, and I was immediately
    aware that it was a wreck. I earnestly entreated the Lord to save me, and then I lay waiting a few seconds. Then followed a tremendous impact, and a few horrible screams. I seemed to be gently moved from one position to another. I did not hit anything at any time during the crash. Just before the final impact I was turned face downward. I drew up my legs and hunched my back, and wondered whether God wanted me saved; if not, would death be instantaneous, or would I be pinned down with a mangled body?

    The final crash came and still I was not
    thrown against anything-nothing struck
    me. I thankfully said, "Lord, you have
    saved me."

    Then I felt water flowing over me; it
    was soon up to my waist. (I found out
    later it was Diesel oil.) I thought we must have fallen into a river, and I wondered whether I was safe yet. Then there were shouts of "Fire, fire!"

    I was lying about three feet under the debris. My bunk was over me, and I was lying on a mass of smashed planks, yet I was not in discomfort. I pushed upward, and my bunk moved; then, pushing aside, broken boards, I came out on top, without a scratch or a bruise.

    Our train had been traveling between fifty and sixty miles an hour when it
    struck the derailed oil freight. Our engine and first car, a third class, jumped the tracks, and were standing at an angle of about twenty-five degrees at the bottom of a seven-foot embankment. Our oil tanker was then evidently pushed across the track, and the second car crashed into it.
    It was crushed and twisted all out of
    shape, making a mass of wreckage about
    fifteen feet high. The third car, in which I was, was smashed into more than a thousand pieces. It was just a shapeless mass of broken planks, with the tubular oil tank, about fifteen feet long, on top of it, and the Diesel oil flowing all over it. Within four minutes of the crash, the smashed cars, with well over a hundred people in them, were a blazing inferno.

    Immediately on impact the oil tanker
    had caught fire, and the flames by this
    time were more than forty feet high.
    There was a terrible roar from the burning. A biting cold wind blew the flames over my head as they came closer and closer. I heard someone screaming for help, and there about three feet under the wreckage was one of my traveling companions, pinned down, with a chain pressing on his throat and broken planks over him so that he could not move. I did my best to lift the wreckage, but could not.

    I shouted for help, and finally a man
    came, and together we tried to lift, but
    in vain. The man then ran away, because
    the fire was just upon us. My friend who
    was pinned down, Mr. Abbasi, an electrical engineer in the Royal Pakistan Air Force, begged of me not to leave him to be burned up. I called upon God to help me lift that wreckage, and when I bent down to lift. Someone lifted with me, and we were able to lift high enough to set Mr. Abbasi free. He flung his arms round me, crying, "You have saved my life;
    you have saved my life."

    The flames were right upon us, but my
    oil-soaked trousers did not catch fire,
    neither were we scorched. Hand in hand
    my friend and I ran away from the flames.

    I excused myself from my companion, and
    went about fifty yards away behind a
    grove of cactus. There I thanked the Lord for caring for me so wonderfully, and I rededicated my life to His service. It was less than five minutes from the time of the first impact until my compartment was completely enveloped in flames.

    At bedtime the night before, my traveling companions were getting into their pajamas, and I had mine ready, but decided that since we would reach Karachi about daylight, I would sleep in my trousers, shirt, and socks. Later in the night it was very cold, though I was covered with two blankets, so I got up and put on my sweater. Therefore, though all my belongings were destroyed by the fire, I had something to wear that day.

    Several persons, who had been traveling
    in a part of the train that was undamaged and who had lost relatives in those smashed cars, could not control their grief, and above the roar of the flames could be heard their grief-stricken wailing. One railway employee who was working on the train had his wife and four children in the ompartment adjoining ours. They were all destroyed in that terrible fire.
    Those in the compartment to the rear of ours were also destroyed. The angel of the Lord was about those of us who were in the center compartment. I did not see one dead body. All had been burned up in that terrible fire, which continued for many hours. One oil tanker
    after another burst and spilled its contents over an area of several hundred square yards, feeding that awful fire.

    The breakdown special took us away
    from the scene of the accident about one
    o'clock in the afternoon, and we arrived
    in Karachi about four-thirty. After registering with the railway authorities I went to the railway telegraph section to send telegrams to my wife in Bombay and to Division President R. H. Pierson in Poona. After payment I had seven annas left.

    Feeling ashamed to proceed any farther
    without having a shave and getting some
    of the grime wiped off my face, I found a barber who demanded eight annas for a
    shave. Being short one anna, I had to
    bargain with him to accept what money
    I had. An interchange of words brought
    the desired result, and soon I was in a
    taxi on my way to our mission hospital.

    The young woman at the desk wondered
    at the audacity of the disreputable-looking man (oil-soaked trousers, dirty shirt, and no shoes) who asked for Rs. 2/4 to pay his taxi fare. It was not many minutes later that K. S.
    Brown and N. R. Fouts drove me down-
    town to purchase needed articles of attire.

    With passport burned and no return
    voucher for my flight back to Bombay, the situation might well have proved to be a difficult one, but the Lord continued to watch over His own, and by ten-thirty on the twenty-second I was in possession of an emergency passport and a ticket for the flight home. I left Karachi at one-thirty and by four-thirty the Viking landed in Bombay, where loved ones were waiting to meet the plane.

    We were surprised when the following
    account appeared in the Times of India
    the next day:
    "Tales of human fortitude and tragedy
    have been pouring in in the wake of the
    disaster.
    "A veterinary surgeon, who was traveling by the ill-fated train, narrated a story of a European priest, who chose death to save his companions.

    "The surgeon said, after having been
    extricated from the wreckage along with
    his six-year-old daughter, that he heard
    shouts of "help, help!" from an adjacent
    compartment, and he recognized the voice
    as that of the European priest whom he
    knew.

    He asked the priest to come out, but
    the priest was heard to say, "I am safe. I shall come with my companions who are in trouble."

    "Meanwhile the flames enveloped the
    entire compartment, and that was the last that was heard of the priest."

    Well, the one referred to as the "European priest" was I, and when we notified the reporter of the paper that the one reported dead was alive and unhurt, the following article was inserted the next day:

    "A Minister of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in India, who was reported to have been killed in the Jhimpur rail crash, 75 miles from Karachi, has actually escaped from a flaming compartment and reached Bombay by air.

    "He is Pastor A. F. Jessen, President of
    the Northwestern India Union Mission."

    "The pastor stated that he found the
    electrical engineer, his companion in a
    second-class compartment, crushed under
    a seat a few moments after the crash had
    occurred. He tried to extricate the engineer, but found it "impossible" to remove the heavy weight of "debris" which had fallen on him.

    "Pastor Jessen said he then offered a
    prayer and made another attempt to extricate him and succeeded in doing so By that time flames were all around them, but they managed to climb out of the burning compartment."

    I have tried to imagine how the angel
    of the Lord protected me from bumps and
    bruises, apart from death; for though all in my compartment were saved, they were badly cut and bruised. It is not possible to understand, but I am so thankful to be spared for further service!
    (The Youth Instructor, May 4, 1954





     
    Arrival 16 Sep 1954  New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    New York Passenger Lists, 1820 - 1957
    Name: Andrew Jessen Arrival Date: 16 Sep 1954 Estimated birth year: abt 1900 Age: 54 Gender: Male Port of Departure: Southampton, England Place of Origin: Australia Ethnicity/Race­/Nationality: Australian: Ship Name: Ile de France: Port of Arrival: New York, New York Line: 12 Microfilm Serial: T715 Microfilm Roll: T715_8508 Page Number: 174

    Name: Juanita Jessen Arrival Date: 16 Sep 1954 Estimated birth year: abt 1895 Age: 59 Gender: Female Port of Departure: Southampton, England Place of Origin: Australia Ethnicity/Race­/Nationality: Australian Ship Name: Ile de France: Port of Arrival: New York, New York Line: 13 Microfilm Serial: T715 Microfilm Roll: T715_8508 Page Number: 174

    Departure from Southamption, England on 11 Sep 1954. The Ile de France arrived in New York, New York on 16 Sep 1954
    He was listed as a tourist travelling with his wife Juanita. Their home is listed as Box 1025, Collegedale, Tennessee
    [Source: Passenger List of the Ile de France]

    Ile de France
    Gross tonnage: 43,153 (1927), 44,356 (1949)
    Length: 791 feet
    Width: 92 feet
    Machinery: Steam turbines geared to quadruple screw
    Speed: 24 knots
    Capacity: 670 First, 408 Cabin, 508 Third (1927); 541 First, 577 Cabin, 277 Tourist (1949)
    Built: Chantiers de l'Atlantique Shipyard, St. Nazaire, France, 1927
    Demise: Scrapped in Osaka, Japan, 1959
     
    Personal 31 Mar 1955  The Madisonian, Madison College, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Missionary Studies
    Madison Food Plant
    Elder A. F. Jessen, for more than thirty years a missionary to India and most recently president of the Northwestern Union in the Southern Asia Division, has been spending some time at the Food Factory studying the manufacture of Madison Foods. Upon returning to India Elder Jessen plans to establish small food factory units throughout his union. Because of the abundance of soy beans and peanuts grown
    in his country, these factories will
    specialize in the manufacture of soy milk, soy cheese, and Not-Meat.

    The Food Factory workers have greatly enjoyed Elder Jessen's presence with them, especially his stories of elephants and life in India. Many will recall an experience of Elder Jessen's which was publicized by the press about a year ago.

    While he was traveling by train through Pakistan, a collision occurred, setting the coaches on fire. Elder Jessen miraculously rescued a fellow traveler who was pinned beneath the wreckage by
    lifting the very heavy iron from him, thus releasing him. Both escaped a horrible death.
    Vol. 3
    The Madisonian, Madison College, Tennessee, March 31, 1955  
    Personal 1 May 1958  Southern Asia Tidings, POONA, INDIA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Pastor A. F. Jessen, Principal of
    Lowry Memorial High School
    reports an excellent progress and
    bright prospects for the future of
    our health food industry in the
    school.
    (Southern Asia Tidings, POONA, INDIA, MAY 1, 1958)  
    Arrival 7 Nov 1960  From Brisbane, Australia to London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Sea Arrival Card
    Jessen, Andrew Frederick, date of arrival at London, England, United Kingdom, 7 Nov 1960, last permanent address, India, intended next permanent address, USA, intended length of stay in the United Kingdom, three weeks.
    (UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960)

    Jessen, Juanita, date of arrival at London, England, United Kingdom, 7 Nov 1960, last permanent address, India, intended next permanent address, USA, intended length of stay in the United Kingdom, three weeks.
    (UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960)

     
    Departure 25 Nov 1960  From Southampton England Find all individuals with events at this location 

    Name: Andrew Frederick JESSEN Date of departure: 25 November 1960 Port of departure: Southampton Date of Birth: 28 October 1900 Age: 60 (calculated from DOB) Marital status: Married Sex: Male Occupation: Missionary Country of birth: : Last country of residence: India: Intended country of residence: U S A: UK address: 207 SELHURST RD STH NORWOOD LONDON S E 25 Passenger recorded on: Sea departure card
    Name: Juanita JESSEN Date of departure: 25 November 1960 Port of departure: Southampton Date of Birth: 18 February 1895 Age: 65 (calculated from DOB) Marital status: Married Sex: Female Occupation: Missionary Country of birth: Ceylon: Last country of residence: India: Intended country of residence: U S A: UK address: 207 SELHURST RD STH NORWOOD LONDON SE 25: Passenger recorded on: Sea departure card
    Ship: Queen Elizabeth
    Master's name: D. M. Maclean
    Wgere Bound: New York, USA
     
    Profession, Description 1923 - 1964  Ceylon, India and United States of America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Ordained Minister of the Seventh Day Adventist Church and Missionary 
    Died 19 Oct 1964  University of California Hospital, San Francisco, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • CALIFORNIA DEATH INDEX
      JESSEN, Andrew F. Birth Date: 28.10.1901: Mothers Maiden Name. Bunderan: Death Place: San Francisco 90: Death Date: 19.10 1964: Age 64 years

      Andrew F Jessen
      California Death Index
      Name Andrew F Jessen
      Event Type Death
      Event Date 19 Oct 1964
      Event Place San Francisco, California, United States
      Birth Date 28 Oct 1900
      Birthplace Rest Of World
      Gender Male
      Mother's Name Bunderan
      ("California Death Index, 1940-1997," database, FamilySearch)
    Obituary 30 Nov 1964  Pacific Union, Recorder, Vol 64, Angwin, California Find all individuals with events at this location 
    JESSEN, Andrew Frederick was born Oct. 28, 1900, Queensland, Australia; and died in Martinez, Calif., Oct. 19, 1964. As a book salesman he worked his way through Australasian Missionary College. Elder Jessen served as colporteur, principal, and minister in India, as well as building a food factory that is still in buisness. The Jessens came to Martinez on retirement in 1960, and he served as a pastor until his death. Survivors: wife, Juanita; , Ronald; two grandchildren; 2 brothers and five sisters.
    (Pacific Union, Recorder, Vol 64, Angwin, California, November 30, 1964, No.20., Official Organ of the Pacific Union Conference of the Seventh-Day Adventists) 
    Obituary Dec 1964  Ingathering, Southern Asia Tidings, Poona, India Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Until The Day Break
    JESSEN, Andrew Frederick was born Oct. 28, 1900, Queensland, Australia and died Oct. 19, 1964 at the University of California Hospital, San Francisco. Calf., USA., ten days following surgery. In 1925 he was united in marriage to Juanita Lisboa-Pinto. Beginning in 1923 Bro. Jessen canvassed in Ceylon and India. From June, 1925 he was principal of the Kottawa school and acting pastor of Bethel Chapel. In 1938 he was called as president of the Malayalam Field and principal of Kottarakara school, continuing until 1953. Further appointments led him to Bombay as Northwestern India Union President and to South India as Educational Secretary. From March 1956 -Oct 1960 he was principal of Lowry Memorial High School, Bangalore. Pastor Jessen was known in Southern Asia as a dilligent and very practical worker. During the last few years in America he has continued active pastoral work in Martinez, Calif. He is mourned by his wife and one son, Roland (Ronald) Frederick.
    (Ingathering, Southern Asia Tidings, VOLUME 59 POONA, INDIA, DECEMBER 1964 NUMBER 12)
     
    Obituary 3 Dec 1964  Review and Herald Find all individuals with events at this location 
    JESSEN. - Andrew Frederick Jessen, born Oct. 28, 1900 in Queensland, Australia: died Oct. 19, 1964, at Martinez, Calif. He sold books and earned his way through Australasian Missionary College, graduating in 1923. While a book salesman in Ceylon he married college teacher, and together they devoted 38 years to denominational service. Besides being principal of the Kottawa, Kottarakara, and Lowry Memorial high schools, he was president of the Ceylon, Kerala, and Kannada Missions, and of the Northwestern India Union Conference. He built the food factory at Lowry Memorial High School, and in 1960 retired to Martinez, where he was pastor. His wife, Juanita, survives, as do a son, Ronald, two grandchildren, two brothers, and five sisters. grandchildren, two brothers, and five sisters.

    Transcribed from the "Review and Herald, Official Organ of the Seventh - Day Adventist Church, December 3, 1964"
     
    Notes 
    • Escape From Death
      By A. F. Jessen,
      President
      Northwestern India Union Mission About one hundred delegates met together recently at our Roorkee high
      school for six enjoyable days of constituency meetings. From this beautiful spot we had an excellent view of the
      majestic snow-clad ranges of the Himalayas, and the atmosphere was cooled by the breezes coming from those snowy
      heights. During those days we sensed the presence of God with us.
      Meanwhile, a situation had arisen in Pakistan necessitating a visit from one of the division officers. Owing to passport
      requirements, which could not be completed immediately, these brethren were unable to proceed, so it was suggested
      that I should cross the border and bring back a report.
      It was my first visit to Pakistan, and I enjoyed meeting our brethren there and seeing how God was blessing His
      work in that land. Returning, I boarded the express passenger train for Karachi.
      I was in a second-class compartment with five congenial Pakistani passengers. The afternoon passed very pleasantly, and at 10 P.M., after an enjoyable game with the six-year-old daughter of the chief veterinary surgeon of Pakistan, we said our good nights and retired to our berths for sleep; mine was an upper berth.

      God's Care for His Children
      It was at about five-thirty the next morning that the Lord was pleased to display His marvelous power to me. In the
      hope that it might encourage someone who reads this article, I shall relate the experience I had when our train crashed at Jhimpir, seventy-five miles out of Karachi, January 21, 1954.

      Surely God cares for His children.

      There were two railway tracks. On one was our train, going from Lahore to Karachi, having eleven cars and a large
      Diesel engine. On the other was an oil freight with fifteen to twenty tanks filled with oil coming from Karachi. The oil
      freight had been derailed, and one car had evidently come across our track or close to it. It was on a curve of the line, so our engineer could not see it till close by. Our train, traveling between fifty and sixty miles an hour, struck the obstruction, and the engine and first carriage, a third class, jumped the tracks, and were standing at an angle of about twenty-five degrees at the bottom of a seven-foot embankment. The oil tank was then evidently pushed across the track, and the second and third cars crashed into it. It was crushed and twisted all out of shape, making a mass of wreckage about fifteen feet high.
      The third car, in which I was traveling, smashed into more than a thousand pieces. It was just a shapeless mass of broken planks, with the tubular oil tank, about fifteen feet long, on top of it, and the Diesel oil flowing all over
      it.

      Within four minutes of the crash, the smashed cars, with well over a hundred people in them, were a blazing inferno.
      I was in an upper berth of a six-berth second-class compartment. There were first-class compartments at both ends of our car. About 5:30 I was awakened by a jolt, and the carriage had a crazy motion. There were smashing sounds outside, and I was immediately aware that it was a wreck. I entreated the Lord to save me, and then I lay waiting a few
      seconds. Then followed a tremendous impact, and a few horrible screams. I seemed to be gently moved from one
      position to another. I did not hit anything at any time during the crash. Just before the final crash I was turned face downward. I drew up my legs and hunched my back, and wondered whether God wanted me saved; if not, whether
      death would be instantaneous, or whether I would be pinned down with a mangled body.

      The final crash came, and still I was not thrown against anything. Nothing struck me, and I thankfully said,
      "Lord, you have saved me." Then I felt what I thought was water flowing over me; it was soon up to my waist. (I found out later it was Diesel oil.) I thought we must have fallen into a river, and I wondered whether I was saved yet. Then there were shouts of. "Fire, fire!" I said, "Lord, please help me to get out of this." I was lying about three feet under the debris. My bunk was over me, and I was on a mass of smashed planks; yet I was quite comfortable. I pushed upward and my bunk moved; then, pushing aside broken boards, I came out on top, without a scratch.

      Immediately on impact the oil tank had caught fire, and the flames by this time were more than forty feet high, and
      there was a terrible roar from the burning. A biting
      cold wind blew the flames over my head as they came closer and closer. I heard someone screaming for help, and there, about three feet under the wreckage, was one of my traveling
      companions, pinned down, with a chain pressing on his throat and broken planks over him so that he could not move. I did my best to lift the wreckage, but could not. I shouted for help, and finally a man came. Together we tried to lift, but in vain. The man then ran away, because the fire was just upon us.

      My friend, who was pinned down, Mr. Abbasi, an electrical engineer in the Royal Pakistan Air Force, begged me not
      to leave him to be burned up. I called upon God to help me lift that wreckage, and when I bent down to lift, someone
      lifted with me, and we were able to lift high enough to set Mr. Abbasi free. He flung his arms around me crying, "You
      have saved my life, you have saved my life." The flames were right upon us, but my oil-soaked trousers did not catch
      fire, neither were we scorched. Hand in hand my friend and I ran away from the flames.

      I excused myself from my companion, and went about fifty yards away behind a grove of cactus. There I thanked
      the Lord for caring for me so wonderfully, and I rededicated my life to His service. It was less than five minutes from the time of the first impact until my
      compartment was completely enveloped in flames.

      At bedtime the night before, my traveling companions were getting into their pajamas, and I had mine ready, but decided that, since we would reach Karachi about daylight, I would sleep in my trousers, shirt and socks. Later in the
      night it was very cold, though I was covered with two blankets, so I got up and put on my sweater. Therefore,
      though all my belongings were destroyed by the fire, I had something to wear.

      Several persons who had been traveling in the part
      of the train that was undamaged, and who had lost relatives in those two smashed carriages, could not control their grief, and above the roar of the flames could be heard their griefstricken wailing. One railway employee
      who was working on the train had his wife and four children in the compartment adjoining ours. They were all destroyed in that terrible fire. Those in the compartment to the rear of ours were also destroyed.

      Safe and Homeward Bound

      A special train took us away from the scene of the accident about 1 P.M., and we arrived in Karachi about four-thirty.
      After registering with the railway authorities I went to the railway telegraph section to send telegrams to my wife in Bombay and to R. H. Pierson in Poona. Soon I was in a taxi on my way to our mission hospital. It was not many minutes later that Brethren Brown and Fouts drove me downtown to purchase needed articles of attire. With passport burned, and no return voucher for my flight back
      to Bombay, the situation might well have proved to be a difficult one, but the Lord continued to watch over His own,
      and by ten-thirty on January 22 I was in possession of an emergency passport and a ticket for the flight home. I left
      Karachi at one-thirty and by four-thirty. The Viking
      landed in Bombay, where loved ones were waiting to meet the
      plane.

      I am indeed thankful that I was spared. I did not see one dead body. All had been burned up in that terrible fire, which continued for many hours. One oil tank after another burst and spilled its contents over the area of several hundred square yards, feeding that awful fire.

      I have tried to imagine how the angel protected me from bumps and bruises, apart from death; for though all in my
      compartment were saved, they were badly cut and bruised. It is not possible to understand, but I am so thankful to be
      spared for further service!
      (REVIEW AND HERALD, MAY 6, 1954)
    Person ID I4180  Hickey, List, Bundesen, Thomsen, Jensen, Jessen
    Last Modified 8 Jun 2020 

    Father Andrew Frederick Jessen,   b. 10 Dec 1872, Maryborough, Queensland, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 04 Jul 1945, Kingaroy Hospital, Kingaroy, Queensland, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Mother Matilda Christina Bundesen,   b. 1873, Cobden, Greymouth, South Island of New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1949, Kingaroy District, Queensland, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 04 Apr 1894  Tiaro District, Queensland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Marriage Registration:
      Bundesen, Matilda Christina; Marriage: 04.04.1894: Spouse: Jessen Andrew Frederick Reg No. 1894/C1695 [Source: Queensland Marriage Register]
    Family ID F1136  Group Sheet

    Family Juanita Luzia Lisboa-Pinto,   b. 18 Feb 1894, Colombo, Ceylon Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Dec 1979, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 1925  Celon or India Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Ronald Frederick Jessen,   b. 03 Dec 1934, Columbo, Ceylon/Sri Lanka Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 2007, Sherman Oaks, Los Angeles, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
    Last Modified 10 Dec 2010 
    Family ID F1925  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    Andrew Frederick Jessen
    Andrew Frederick Jessen
    Andrew Frederick Jessen
    Seventh day Adventist Missionary in Ceylon, India and United States of America
    28 Oct 1900 - Kingaroy District, Queensland, Australia - 19 Oct 1964, University of California Hospital, San Francisco, California, USA
    (Photo kindly shared by Suzanne Jessen Taylor)

  • Sources 
    1. [S66] Mrs Laurina Collins.

    2. [S115] Trove.


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